Parental stress and parenting in Chinese immigrant families: The mediating role of social support

Resource type
Authors/contributors
Title
Parental stress and parenting in Chinese immigrant families: The mediating role of social support
Abstract
Abstract As the population of Chinese immigrants has been growing rapidly in the United States, it has been understudied on the parenting behaviours as well as the roles parental stress and social support playing in parenting in this group. This study investigated whether parental stress was associated with parenting and whether this relationship was mediated by social support in a sample of 255 Chinese immigrant parents from the Survey of Asian American Families in New York City. Regression analyses with a rich array of control variables found that a higher level of parental stress and the presence of one or more stressors such as unemployment, low income, and low education were positively associated with the use of harsh discipline and parent?child conflicts and negatively associated with positive parenting practices. Social support functioned as a significant mediator in the relationships between parental stress and positive parenting practices but not in the relationships of parental stress with parent?child conflict or the use of harsh discipline.
Publication
Child & Family Social Work
Volume
25
Issue
S1
Pages
135-148
Date
August 1, 2020
Journal Abbr
Child & Family Social Work
DOI
10.1111/cfs.12734
ISSN
1356-7500
Accessed
2021-07-28
Extra
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Notes

https://doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12734

Citation
Liu, S.-W., Zhai, F., & Gao, Q. (2020). Parental stress and parenting in Chinese immigrant families: The mediating role of social support. Child & Family Social Work, 25(S1), 135–148. https://doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12734